CT scans reveal mummy died of heart attack 3,000 years ago

Sci-Tech


CT scans reveal ‘the mummy of the screaming woman’ died of a massive heart attack 3,000 years ago and developed a death spam before being embalmed

  • A site found in Egypt in 1881 was used for royals to avoid grave robbers 
  • One of the mummies was a woman with her head tilted and her mouth open
  • Experts used CT scans to determine what caused her death 3,000 years ago
  • She suffered from a massive heart attack and was found hours later
  • Since she was found later, her body developed a death spasm
  • Embalmers did not place her body back, but embalmed it as it was found 

A hidden location in Egypt was first uncovered during the late 1800s that held the remains of royals to save them from grave robbers, and the death of one individual has remained a mystery since –until now.

Called ‘the mummy of the screaming woman,’ she was embalmed with her head titled back and mouth open as if crying in terror.

Researchers employed the power of CT scans to reveal the Egyptian princess died of a massive heart attack 3,000 years ago.  

The position of the remains suggests the woman was not discovered until hours after, which was long enough to develop death spasms and embalmers preserved the body as it was found.

A hidden location in Egypt was first uncovered during the late 1800s that held the remains of royals to save them from grave robbers, and the death of one individual has remained a mystery since –until now

In 1881, the Royal Cachette of Deir El-Bahari was discovered in Luxor, Egypt.

This site was used by priests of the 21st and 22nd dynasties to hide the remains of royals in a bid to save them from grave robbers, ahramonline reports

And inside was ‘the mummy of the screaming woman,’ along with ‘the mummy of the screaming man.’

Previous studies used CT scans to unravel the mystery of the man, which was prince Pentawere who was the son of King Ramses III.

Researchers employed the power of CT scans to reveal the Egyptian princess died of a massive heart attack 3,000 years ago. The results show she suffered from a severe case of atherosclerosis that affected a number of her arteries

Researchers employed the power of CT scans to reveal the Egyptian princess died of a massive heart attack 3,000 years ago. The results show she suffered from a severe case of atherosclerosis that affected a number of her arteries

Experts believe her name was Meret Amun, but are unsure which princess she was as there were three by that name throughout history. The female mummy received her name due to signs of terror on the face

Experts believe her name was Meret Amun, but are unsure which princess she was as there were three by that name throughout history. The female mummy received her name due to signs of terror on the face

The prince was forced to commit suicide by way of hanging as a punishment for his attempt to murder his father, which is known in history as the Harem Conspiracy.

His body was wrapped in sheep skin, unlike the usual white linen that is found around royals – like the screaming woman.

Experts believe her name was Meret Amun, but are unsure which princess she was as there were three by that name throughout history.

The female mummy received her name due to signs of terror on the face – her head titled back and mouth frozen as if she was screaming in pain.

To uncover the mystery, Egyptologist Zahi Hawass and Sahar Saleem, professor of radiology at Cairo University used a CT scan to reveal what caused her death some 3,000 years ago.

The results show she suffered from a severe case of atherosclerosis that affected a number of her arteries.

Previous studies used CT scans to unravel the mystery of the man, which was prince Pentawere who was the son of King Ramses III. Dubbed 'the mummy of the screaming man,' he was forced to hang himself for being involved in the murder of his father

Previous studies used CT scans to unravel the mystery of the man, which was prince Pentawere who was the son of King Ramses III. Dubbed ‘the mummy of the screaming man,’ he was forced to hang himself for being involved in the murder of his father

This disease formed in the arterial wall, leading to a narrowing of the cavity and blockage of the vessel, and can be determined in a CT scan.

Hawass and Saleem concluded the screaming woman died suddenly of a massive heart attack and was not found until hours later, which allowed time for a death spasm – resulting in the form in which she was buried.

The team also found that the brain had not been removed, which was a common practice among royals.

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