Outrage as cosmetic surgery company sells T-shirts with ‘scars’

Misc


Outrage as cosmetic surgery company sells T-shirts with ‘scars’ showing where girls’ healthy breasts will be cut off if they start identifying as boys, claiming it’s a ‘bit of fun’

  • Cosmetic Surgery Partners in London been met with criticism on social media
  • Clinic is allegedly selling T-shirts with double mastectomy surgical scars
  • Plastic surgeon Dr Miles Berry took to Instagram to unveil clinic’s new T-shirts 

A cosmetic surgery company has sparked outrage after it announced it would be selling T-shirts marked with double mastectomy surgical scars.

Plastic surgeon at Cosmetic Surgery Partners in London, Dr Miles Berry, took to social media to unveil the clinic’s new range of T-shirts that would allow those looking to transition from female to male to ‘test the waters’.

However the doctor has since been met with criticism, with those opposed to the clothing range arguing it was ‘grotesque’ and insensitive to breast cancer survivors.

The clinic has since confirmed they have not sold nor will it be selling the T-shirts. 

A surgeon at Cosmetic Surgery Partners in London previously said the clinic would be selling T-shirts that have double-mastectomy surgical scars on them

Surgeon Miles Berry took to social media to unveil the clinic's new range of T-shirts in a post which has now been deleted

Surgeon Miles Berry took to social media to unveil the clinic’s new range of T-shirts in a post which has now been deleted

Taking to Instagram the aesthetic surgeon, wrote: ‘With lockdown easing and better access to the Post Office, thought it might be time to test the waters.  

‘There are a few each of sizes XS, S, M, L and XL (currently grey only). £20 each (including postage within the UK) with 25% to charity-open to suggestions for the latter. Basket soon to be live on www.cosmeticurgery-partners.co.uk.’

However after being met with criticism by one social media user the doctor went on to explain: ‘Thanks for you comment and I am sorry it has led to you to question our compassion.

‘In fact, it started as a bit of fun that we thought we could provide some additional benefit.

‘Whilst I did research some of the charities, being-cis- felt it might trample on sensitiveness of the trans community if we did not solicit some opinion.’

When contacted by MailOnline a spokesperson for the clinic said: ‘I can confirm the post has now been removed.’

They added: ‘Our clinic has not sold nor will it be selling the T-shirts.’

Following the post, which has since been deleted, social media users criticised the clothing range and suggested it was far from ‘a bit of fun’.

Plastic surgeon Miles Berry said that with lockdown easing and better access to the Post Office it was 'time to test the waters'

Plastic surgeon Miles Berry said that with lockdown easing and better access to the Post Office it was ‘time to test the waters’

The doctor later explained that the project started as a 'bit of fun' and was aimed at providing 'additional benefit'. The clinic has since said it had not sold nor would it be selling the T-shirts

The doctor later explained that the project started as a ‘bit of fun’ and was aimed at providing ‘additional benefit’. The clinic has since said it had not sold nor would it be selling the T-shirts

One user wrote: ‘I was thinking about how breast cancer survivors might feel seeing girls walking round with T-shirts like that.’

While another added: ‘Geezo that is without doubt one of the worst things I’ve saw under the guise of a ‘bit of fun’.

Another person commented: ‘This is grotesque.’

Meanwhile another person wrote: ‘As a woman who has had a double-mastectomy I can say these T-shirts are the obvious missing item in the cancer welcome pack.’

Elsewhere another social media user added: ‘There is so much wrong with this I don’t know where to begin.’ 

A transgender mastectomy, which is also called a masculinising chest surgery, involves the removal of unwanted breast tissue and sees the surgeon reconstruct the chest. 

Social media users took to Twitter to share their outrage, with one asking how breast cancer patients would feel

Social media users took to Twitter to share their outrage, with one asking how breast cancer patients would feel

In some cases, the areola and nipples are removed and resized before being grafted back onto the body.   

According to the NHS, those who think they may have gender dysphoria are referred to a gender dysphoria clinic (GDC) where a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals offer ongoing assessments, treatments, support and advice.

These treatments can include: psychological support, cross-sex hormone therapy and speech and language therapy to help the patient sound more typical of their gender identity.

Some people may decide to have surgery to permanently change their body and will be referred to a surgeon.

Those looking to transition will have to live as their preferred gender identity for at least a year before a referral is made for gender surgery.    

Advertisement



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *